On intelligence is intuitive

1: what happens to a society when mystery is labeled as evil? it yields an ever-connected chain of false labels and misinterpretations the indigenous are labeled as savage terorists and plotted against the open-hearted are manipulated into slavery the vulnerable are penetrated by force of law citizens where is your allegiance? why do you pledge […]

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On storytelling

Sometimes you just need creative inspiration and the universe just… delivers. Paul Simon, Andrew Bird + Chris Thile and the Punch Brothers, via A Praire Home Companion — Also: the obligatory Hamilton reference: LMM on your twenties + immigrants; Rudy Francisco, Love Poem

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On finding inspiration

Beyond thankful that my singular wish of 2015 – to see Hamilton – came true! The cast album is certainly wonderful, but the brilliance of the live experience is something I won’t soon forget. Happy to report the show exceeded my (very high) expectations and deserves every superlative. While in NYC, K and I tried to absorb as […]

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On …Jenny

Maybe because it’s Saturday, or maybe because there’s been a ton of unpleasant news lately — here’s something wonderful: (see also: puppies.)

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On Appomattox

Given that I can’t be in DC for the revision of Appomattox, I’m hoping hard for a recording. From NPR — The original version of Glass’ opera focused on the end of the war and the attempts to address the underlying issue of slavery. But nearly 10 years later, the revised version splits the opera’s two […]

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On interviews

I think I safely fall into the camp that would happily have a conversation with Terry Gross. I’d be lying if — like the Ira Glass note below — I didn’t admit to listening to her interviews to study the nuance of the art. From Susan Burton’s profile of Terry Gross in the New York Times […]

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On reframing history

Over at The Atlantic, Edward Delamn talks with (genius!) Lin-Manuel Miranda about how his work of art is influencing how people understand the past — Delman: You talked about seeing people use the opening song in classrooms—how do you think your interpretation of Hamilton and this period will shape the way people understand the man and his […]

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On Shakespeare and refugees

The Economist’s Prospero blog notes Sir Ian McKellen’s ongoing performance of a monologue from ‘Sir Thomas More‘ — The scene is based on a real historical event, the “Ill May Day” of May 1st 1517. A mob of working-class apprentices had gathered in London’s Cheapside district, planning to burn the houses of the city’s growing […]

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On perpetrators and victims

Stumbled across a fascinating conversation hosted over at Foreign Policy: in discussing victims and perpetrators of genocide, Joshua Oppenheimer and David Rieff touch on film, intervention, kitsch and smugness. [note, the transcript is a reduxed version of the audio] Joshua Oppenheimer: Most nonfiction films dealing with human rights abuse tend to tell us that things are well in […]

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